success

How Manage Your Expectations

Does this sound familiar? Your following a pretty strict meal plan in hopes of losing some body fat. You could only white-knuckle your way through the meal plan for so long before you started sneaking in extras, usually in the form of nuts and nut butter. You toss back a heaping spoonful of almond butter and was immediately hit with a huge wave of guilt.

peanut-butter-300x375

You tell yourself, “Great, this day is ruined!”, and then proceeded to do what the majority of people do when they fall off their meal plan: swan dive into the pantry for more snacks, blowing the rest of the day to smithereens.

Over the years and even more recently in our Drop 2 Jean Size program, I’ve had many conversations with people just like this who were frustrated by this seemingly lack of control and overwhelming feeling of guilt. Heck I can attest that I have been there myself many times in my own life.

They viewed their success with nutrition and training as either “good” or “bad”, leading them to either feel like a total rock star or a total failure. All it took was a small handful of chocolate or some extra nut butter to make them believe the day was a monumental waste, which then resulted in a landslide of poor food choices for the remainder of that day.

Without exception, they were expecting perfection from themselves, which was a huge mistake.

Whether you are working towards improving your nutrition skills, losing body fat, or getting stronger, how do you set realistic expectations?

Two of the most common questions that we get as a Coach here at Fit-2-The-Core are:

·       “How much weight should I expect to lose in ‘x’ amount of time?”

·       “How much stronger should I expect to get in ‘x’ amount of time?”

These are fair but tricky questions: we don’t have the answers, because they depend on so many factors.

By learning to better manage your expectations, you can help avoid becoming too emotionally attached to a specific result, and cope better if things don’t pan out exactly the way you envision them.

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The One Thing You Can Control
Life is guaranteed to surprise you: it will surprise you in positive ways, and it will surprise you in negative ways. You can have your workout schedule in place, only to see the gym suddenly close for the week due to a burst pipe. You can plan all of your healthy meals for the week, and be surprised by your family paying you an unexpected visit and bringing over pizza for dinner.

When we set expectations, it’s easy to be let down because things don’t systematically happen as we predicted. No matter what happens, however, you can find peace in knowing that you are doing your very best with whichever situation comes your way. This means taking responsibility for your actions when things aren’t going according to plan. If you can’t go to the gym, can you take a walk instead? If you are served pizza, can you enjoy one slice and then eat later when there are different food options available?

The one thing that you can expect and control is that you are in charge of your own actions and reactions, regardless of outside circumstances.

Not Every Day Will Be a Day to Work Towards Your Goal
It can be really easy to expect perfection in terms of nutrition and working out, but the fact of the matter is that not every day will be the right day to work on your goals. Some days are better for focusing on maintenance, and that’s great!

John Berardi owner of Precision Nutrition uses a great analogy,

When life is dialed up to 10 (you are traveling, your kids are sick, you’re working overtime, your spouse is out of town, your sick etc.) you have to dial down your expectations and goals for that day week or month”.

This expectation can set you up for failure, because not every day can be a fat loss day, or a day where we become stronger, or a day where we improve our eating skills. Know that life will happen, and the most we can do is handle it in the best way we can and come up with a strategy that will fit into the context of your life at any given time.

Put in the Work
This is closely related to what I mentioned above about only being able to control your actions and reactions, but it’s worth mentioning in a different way:

Rather than focusing on expectations, what would happen if you poured all of your energy into simply committing to doing your very best with the hand you are dealt each day? Doing good enough, in relation to what life is throwing at you at any specific moment, adjust your workout, your nutrition and most importantly your mindset.

If you planned a 60 minute workout, 15 minutes will have to do, if you’re stuck in a meeting and all that’s available is pizza, eat one piece and then focus on what you have control over, the next meal etc..

Ultimately, that is all you can control.

Two-Sportswomen-Running-400x300

Zoom Out
When our expectations don’t pan out the way we had hoped, it’s easy to lose sight of the good things. Don’t to let an extra heaping spoonful of almond butter detract from the fact that maybe you ate veggies at all of my meals that day, drank plenty of water, got lots of sleep, and exercised. I see this often, the focus is solely on the fall, not that you got back up on your feet and took control over the rest of your day.

When it comes to expectations, there are a lot of variables at play. This means that we can’t always predict an accurate outcome, which can leave us feeling disappointed. It’s important to refrain from letting expectations steal joy from the experience.

The key is to focus on what you are able to do with what’s available, and commit to do your very best, consistently everyday!

 

 

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Women Looking in Fridge

The Battle of the Yummy Splurge vs. The Lazy Cheat

Your week is snowballing from one commitment to the next, no time to stop and get refocused; at some point you make the decision to either take a moment for yourself and plan your meals in advance, making sure your kitchen is stocked and food is cooked ahead of time or…you never get around to it and get “lazy” figuring you’ll get back on track tomorrow or next week.

It usually starts after a long day of working or running around fulfilling commitments, giving your energy all day long. You get home just in time for dinner…you’re hungry, your family is hungry, you haven’t taken a moment to think through what you’ll eat tonight; you open the fridge and maybe there are some chicken breasts you could grill up, but that isn’t really hitting the spot and you’re tired and really don’t feel like cooking so you decide…forget it, let’s order pizza or let’s go out.

Have you ever looked back at your week and realized you used all of your splurges for the week and didn’t really enjoy any of them? They were lazy cheats, convenient at that moment, but overall not really worth it.

Yummy Splurge:

100% nutritional discipline is never really needed to completely change your body. The difference between sticking to the rules 90% of the time and sticking to them 100% of the time is minor, really.

And that extra 10% splurge means you can feel free to eat the food you like.

Follow the rules 90% of the time. The other 10% splurge? Eat anything you want.

I’m not kidding around here. I actively encourage people to eat any food they like, because the reality is that good food can be one of the great joys of life.

But being overweight, unhealthy and lethargic are not. And certain foods eaten too frequently or in too large an amount will quickly make you all three of those things.

So Fit-2-The-Core members are given a simple instruction: eat any food you like, in up to 10% of your meals; in the other 90% of your meals, eat the foods that will fuel your body to success. This can include a glass of wine, 1-2 slices of pizza or a scoop of your favorite ice cream etc.

That ratio will give you the body you want AND allow to enjoy the food you love.

 

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The Lazy Cheat – The lazy cheat is a cheat that you did not plan to have ahead of time. It isn’t because you’re really looking forward to a splurge – something you have been craving – or as part of an experience that you don’t want to miss out on – it is not a part of the plan to get you closer to your goals. BUT (yes, Behold the Underlying Truth) occasionally, it happens. Unfortunately a lazy cheat is usually not worth it, and you end up using up one of your splurges and not enjoying it. And unfortunately, once you give in and have a lazy cheat it tends to perpetuate a whole week of lazy cheats.

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The secret to overcoming lazy cheats – have strategies in place. The fact is that “Strategy trumps Willpower” every time and is the key to your short and long term success. When you’ve had a long day, are hungry and out of energy, your will power is not going to be strong, so you must have a strategy.

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Next time you find yourself having that conversation in your head leading to a lazy cheat…you know the one… “I don’t feel like cooking tonight, I’ve had a long day, I’ll just order pizza tonight since I should eat something,” turn to the strategy you have planned out ahead of time.

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Here are a few ideas for the next time you find yourself heading for a lazy cheat.

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Have menus in your car of places you know you can get a healthy meal that are your go-to restaurants. Simply have a whole stack of menus in your car of places where you can get grilled fish and cabbage salad, or chicken and vegetables, or a healthy salad. If your on your way home from a busy day with no plan for dinner, you can just call and place an order to go and pick it up on your way home.

take out menu

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Have easy meals that you fall back on at these times. An easy meal can be a chicken breast with a can of lentil soup – Just grill up the chicken breast, heat up the can of soup and pour the soup over the chicken breast – done. Or you can pick up a pre-cooked rotisserie chicken from whole foods and some precut veggies to grill or for making a quick salad.

Whole Foods Chicken

 

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Have a Super Shake: It’s okay to have a shake for dinner.  Dinner doesn’t have to be a big, sit down meal. Blend up a scoop of protein, some fruit or peanut butter and call it dinner or try this Delicious Super Shake recipe:

POPEYE’S SUPER SPINACH SMOOTHIE

smoothie

INGREDIENTS:

• 1 scoops SFH Low Carb Grass Fed Vanilla Protein

• 1 cup unsweetened almond milk

• 1-2 cups spinach

•½ frozen banana

• 1 tbsp natural peanut butter • stevia (to taste)

• 5 ice cubes

Blend and Enjoy:)

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Plan out your week ahead of time, including your splurges. Your week should include 10% to relax and enjoy yourself, just don’t waste it on a lazy cheat!

tracking sheets

 

 

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Enjoy your week!

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The “Missing Link” To Feeling and Looking Your Best

If I had a penny for every time I hear the statement “ I know what to do, I just can’t seem to do it”, I would have a lot of pennies 🙂

It’s clear that in the age of the Internet we have so much information about exercise and nutrition at our fingertips that you may feel the same way, you know what to do, you just can’t seem to put it altogether or in most cases, keep it together.

Once you reach a certain level of knowledge and experience, the missing link is no longer a new exercise program, the perfect nutrition plan, or a new supplement to try.

The one thing you’re missing is this: being accountable—to someone or something—for your workouts and nutrition.

“Accountability is the acknowledgment of responsibility for your actions with the obligation to report, explain, and be responsible for the resulting consequences.”

In other words, accountability keeps you consistent because you have to report back what you’re doing—or not doing—in the gym and in the kitchen to someone else.

In fact, accountability is more important than personal motivation for this simple reason:

Simply put: if you can’t be consistent, you can’t make progress.

And that’s why accountability—not the perfect exercise or eating program—is the thing that turns everything around.

I will take 70% nutritional and exercise consistency throughout the year over 100% adherence 2 to 3 months out of the year. One will lead to consistent progress, while the other will lead to disappointment and frustration. This is the “ALL” or “NOTHING” mindset, which often leads to nothing. I think most people start with the wrong mindset and believe that weight loss or reaching their goals is some kind of race, which is why most (90% fail in the long run).

It’s often these times of nothing that we start to look for the next program or the next new diet, when the answer to your problem is right in front of you, ACCOUNTABILITY.

Accountability is the key to consistent and long-term progress. Without it you have nothing but motivation to rely on and I’m sorry to tell you that motivation is simply going to fail time and time again.

You are not going to want to get up every morning for you workouts, you are going to want to eat that ice cream, drink your wine or eat that bag of potato chips in your cupboards that have been calling your name, Without accountability those weak moments where you give into temptation will just lead to more and more and more if you don’t have someone and something to be held accountable to, to reel you in and remind you of your commitment to your health and fitness.

So, the big question? How do you get accountability?

Here are two strategies you can use immediately that I learned when completing my Precision Nutrition Master Level 2 Certification:

Accountability strategy #1: Commit to more… and/or less.

 To be consistent, you need to commit to more, and/or less. Let me explain what I mean.

We all make half-hearted promises to ourselves, only to get frustrated and break them soon after. And that’s fine (and understandable). But for a different result, we need a different sort of commitment.

Option 1: Commit to more.

The idea is to commit to something bigger than your self. Bonus points if you can make it fun.

One of the easiest ways is to set up a contest with friends. Who can go the longest without skipping an exercise day? Who can cook the most meals at home instead of eating out?

Notice that it’s not about achievement (who lost the most weight, etc.). It’s about doing.

Focus on and reward yourself for what you do (going to the gym, cooking a meal), not what you achieve, at least at first. Because that’s what you have immediate control over.

What do you think you can accomplish with just one month of consistent workouts and healthy eating?

What about one year?

Our members are about to commit to our 100 Workout Challenge in the last half of the year starting on July 1st. This comes to 4 workouts a week for the next six months. This is a perfect example of committing to more.

Option 2: Commit to less.

 This is the tough one. Our natural tendency is to over-promise and under deliver, especially to ourselves. One of the easiest (and most counter-intuitive) ways to stay consistent is to do the opposite.

Under-promise and over deliver. Consider every promise you’re about to make to yourself a rough, first draft.

Before truly committing, ask yourself, “On a scale of 1-10, how confident am I that I could do this every day for the next 30 days?”

If your gut reaction is anything other than “9” or “10”, find a way to make that promise smaller or easier.

For example turn “I’ll cut out sugar every day” into:

“I’ll stop eating each meal when I’m 80% full.”

Eat what you’re already eating, just slightly less.

“I’ll eat one (more) home-made meal a day.”

Focus on mindfully creating a single meal.

“I’ll eat one big salad a day.”

Focus on eating one more well-chosen meal, even if you have to buy it. Even fast food chains have salads with chicken these days.

And turn “I’ll go to the gym every morning at 6AM” into:

“I’ll do 40 air squats at home, right after waking up.”

Do something with no travel or equipment required.

“I’ll get two solid workouts in per week, scheduled in my calendar, and go from there.”

Reduce the commitment to something you can always stick to; do more only if you can, making it entirely optional.

“I’ll park further away from work / school and walk the rest of the way.”

Even easier.

Those are just examples, of course. You’ll find one that works for you.

Keep reducing the commitment until it feels too easy for you. Until you can answer “9” or “10” without even thinking about it. Those are the things that you can actually do consistently.

“Your daily accomplishments can be big, but keep your commitments small”

Option 3: Commit to both more and less.

Commit to something big and external (like the friendly bet with your friends or co-workers) or one of our challenges throughout the year.

And while doing so, commit to tackling only one part of that larger commitment at a time. Reduce the size of each mini-commitment until you feel almost 100% confident you can actually do it for 30 days.

Accountability Strategy #2:
Get some help from at least one other person.

Have you ever went through a time when you started skipping one or two workouts each week because you were too “busy”?

The exercise didn’t matter much in the context of one week—it’s not like you felt like you were getting out of shape every time you skipped one. But they started added up. Within a month you missed nearly half of of your gym time. Not good.

And it was showing in the mirror. you looked a little less “in-shape” than you would have liked. Plus you just felt crappy and a little guilty.

Obviously your problem wasn’t a program one. No special workout routine, new diet plan, or magical supplement could help.

What you had was an accountability problem. You weren’t committing to anything. And because of that, you were slacking.

This happens periodically to some of our members when they stop committing to more or less with their coaches or peers. They just start to go through the motions and stop leaning on us for support and accountability, or they just too busy and slowly make less and less time for themselves.

So in this case we reach out in an effort to get them to commit to one of the three options above.

Even though they they have access to an effective work out and  know how to eat healthy, they still struggle at certain times of the year.

So we reach out and ask them to commit to more or less so we can hold them accountable to their goals.

Of course they could still skip their workouts if they wanted to. But that would result in their coaching calling to check in and find out why they missed their workout or didn’t follow through on a nutritional habit that they committed to.

Not surprisingly, when they recommitted and became accountable to more or less with one of our coaches, they often don’t miss a single workout, or get back track with eating “X” amount of compliant meals a week.

And they feel incredible.

What can you learn from this?

First, know that we all sometimes struggle with staying in shape. It’s no big deal and doesn’t mean you’re deficient in any way. It just means you’re human.

Second, know that if you’re struggling to get in shape the best thing you can do is hire someone to keep you accountable, this is exactly why our clients are able to continue to make progress in the long run, as soon as they start to get off track, our coaches are able to reel them back in. They also have the benefit of having a friend our workout partner who will meet the at the gym or hold them accountable to to their commitments.

Keep track of your commitments and check in with who is holding you accountable every week or every two weeks, but make sure to regularly track so your coach, trainer or workout partner so they can support you, by holding you accountable.

The goal of these strategies are to be consistent so you can  continue to make progress throughout each and every year. It’s these small but significant wins that lead to how you want to feel, look and play for the rest of your life.

 

 

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Nancy Mirror

Flip Your Priorities When It Comes To Fat Loss

One lesson I have learned over the past 14 years being fitness professional is that common sense is not so common.  Now this has nothing to do with the all the amazing members of Fit-2-The-Core over the years I’ve had the pleasure of working with, it’s the advice they get from the Media, Doctors and Friends that have taught me this very valuable lesson.

I had a big reality check this week, as a Doctor of one of my newest members actually prescribed that she stops strength training until she loses 6 pounds, no distinction between fat or muscle, just 6 pounds. His prescription was to perform a 4-5 week aerobic training program until she loses 6 pounds and then she could return to strength training – this blew my mind!

It seems that there is so much misinformation out there, that even Doctors must be confused by all of it. The fact is that there is information overload when it comes to fitness and I understand why the average person could be confused, but I really don’t understand why a medical professional would be. I believe if someone is going to give you advice, that they must back it up by science not hype, they must be a real world practitioner working with clients who got real results and have experience as a coach in this field.

Now beyond this doctors’ recommendations I do believe there are many people maybe even including you, that still believe that aerobics is more effective than strength training.  Don’t mistake this with interval training or aka HIIT, as this is an effective strategy for fat loss, but stills fall shorts of the fat loss benefits associated with resistance training.

Cardio is simply anything that gets your heart rate-up; your body doesn’t know the difference, whether your jogging or performing kettle bell swings. The distinction between what type of result you get from cardio are the intensity or heart rate zones you’re working in. Simply imagine how different of a feeling it is to jog and sprint. Jogging can be done for hours, where sprinting at maximal speeds can only be done for seconds, and there is a huge difference in how your body adapts.

Now of course I don’t believe that someone who hasn’t worked out in awhile should just go head first into a high intensity strength or interval workout. So the initial goal is to move better and feel better while learning many of the movement skills required for the progression into higher intensity efforts, as this is where the fat loss magic happens.

So in a sense this could be considered a form of aerobic training and slowly as you start to move better, feel better and become proficient at many of the exercises,  you start to ramp up the intensity. The same holds true for cardio, this is why the way we utilize heart rate training is so effective, it meets you where your current fitness level is (at), keeping you in the recovery zone longer than the training zone. Over the weeks you start to spend more time in the higher intensity zones as your fitness improves.

This is the beauty of strength training, it helps you to move better, and it gets you stronger and leaner, reshaping your body and mindset. It also increases many of the growth hormones that increases your bone mass, lean mass (the reason why scale weight is not a an effective measure for progress), insulin sensitivity and decreases many health risks such as heart disease, obesity and osteoporosis, something aerobics simply doesn’t do effectively.

I believe people; even Doctors apparently forget that it’s your muscles that move your limbs, not your heart. Also muscle is where sugar and fat is burned, so why do something that will shrink what basically increases how many calories you burn throughout your day?

Simply put strength-training changes the way your body looks, by gaining precious lean muscle mass, bone mass all while helping you to lose inches (This is why the scale can tell you lost minimum weight, but you dropped two clothes sizes). Now interval training compliments this perfectly by giving you some of the same hormonal effects, but also helps to stimulate the metabolism even further by demanding more fat calories be burned throughout the day, just like strength training, but for a shorter period of time.

Aerobics is the least effective strategy for fat loss, but it can compliment the other two as a recovery strategy and yes you burn some calories, but you do not improve your metabolism at all. In fact you only burn calories during your exercise effort, and depending on how much you do, you can slow your metabolism down.

Take a look at these two studies:

Six Month Study
Two Groups:
Diet Only
Diet Plus aerobic exercise (50mins, 5 days per week)
No additional effect of aerobic exercise on body composition
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan 2
Effect of calorie restriction with or without exercise on body composition and fat distribution
Reedman et al

Twelve Month Study

  • Six hours of aerobic training per week for one year.(60 mins per day, six days per week)
  • Average weight loss after one year was 3.5lbs or about .3lbs per month
  • 08lbs for women and 3.96lbs for men

Obesity 2007 June- 15:1496-1512

Exercise Effect on Weight Training and Body fat in Men and Women

Mctierman et al

The first study showed that 5 days of 50 minutes of aerobics for 6 months resulted in zero weight or fat loss. So they performed 1,200 minutes or aerobics and got nothing from it, talk about a waste of time.

The second study was for 12 months at 60 minutes 6 days a week of aerobic training, and at the end of the year, they lost only 3.5 lbs. that work (17,280 minutes) and only .3lbs of weight loss a month, not even sure of fat loss, as they didn’t distinguish between fat loss and muscle loss, so who knows?

This study compares aerobic training to interval training:

20 weeks of endurance training vs 15 weeks Interval training

  • Energy cost of endurance training = 28,661 calories.
  • Interval Training= 13,614 calories (less than half)
  • The interval training group showed a NINE TIMES greater loss in subcutaneous fat that the endurance group(when corrected for energy cost).

Burn Fewer Calories and Burn more Fat with Interval Training

  • Tremblay A, Simoneau JA, Bouchrd C.
  • Impact of exercise intensity on body fatness and skeletal muscle metabolism
  • 1990 Jul;43(7):814-8

Interval group burned nine times more fat and spent 47% less time exercising, ouch. The correction for energy cost is the amount of calories that the interval training group burned for the next 24-48 hours after their workout, EPOC(Exercise Post Oxygen Consumption). This is the beauty of interval training, you work without oxygen during the high intensity part of the interval workout, creating an oxygen deficit that your body must payback, so it increases your oxygen uptake during the next 24-48 hours, increased in fat calories burned, yay.

These are just a couple studies, but I believe it’s very clear that aerobics is literally a waste of time and effort and it’s because your body adapts to aerobic exercise by creating an environment that burns less calories. It does this simple by shrinking your metabolic engine (lean muscle mass) so you can go longer. This is why marathon runners have very little muscle mass compared to sprinters and also why they have a higher body fat percentage compared to sprinters, aerobics results is a hybrid human, just like a hybrid vehicle, not the goal if your looking to lose fat and get stronger.

Lets look at one study that shows the power of strength training when it comes to fat loss:

  • This study compared three groups following a hypocaloric diet for 12 weeks.
  • Group one was a diet only group. Group two was
    diet, plus resistance exercise plus a casein (milk) supplement. Group three was identical to group two although they used a whey protein supplement.
  • After 12 weeks the diet only group had a loss of 5.5lbs of fat with no change in lean mass. The resistance plus whey(cheese) group had a total fat loss of 9.2lbs and a lean mass gain of 4.4lbs. The resistance plus casein group showed a total fat loss of 15.4lbs and a lean muscle gain of 8.8lbs.

Demling RH, DeSanti L.

Effect of a hypocaloric diet, increased protein intake and resistance training on lean mass gains and fat mass loss in overweight police officers.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2000;44(1):21-9.

In both cases, fat loss was 2 to 3 times greater in the resistance training group that diet alone, with one extra huge benefit, they increased their lean muscle, thus their amount of calories throughout their day (Basal Metabolic Rate). Something even interval training can’t match.

That’s scientific evidence part, here is the real results of real people using these strategies:

Deirdre B&AW

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Of course your diet is key as we see in all these studies, but this was a focus on exercise intervention and what strategies are most effective. Here are your priorities when it comes to fat loss:

  1. Train Hard or Go Home! Stop wasting your time.
  2. Completely flip your priorities when it comes to exercise. Focus on strength training, then interval training and then cardio.
  3. Take the emphasis off of burning calories during your workout and instead make boosting your metabolism the priority long term.  Use exercise that will increase your metabolic rate, which means resistance training.
  4. Use interval style cardio instead of steady state.

There you have it, now you will be the common sense solution in a not so common sense world.

Want a Team that will give you everything you need, Support, Accountability, Evidence based and real world results using proven and effective nutritional strategies, Exercise strategies and Think Right Strategies. Give us a try for 14 days and see what happens when you have team that has your bask every step of the way. Give us a call now at 925-672-5777 or email us at tina@fti2thecore.com for your complimentary body blueprint session today!

 

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Good Habits

The 10 Habits Of Good Nutrition

Before we begin, I’m going to level with you here: changing the rules means changing your habits – and it’s difficult. Not only does it take a desire to change (the “want to”) but also a strategy (the “how to”).

The “want to” is all your own. But the “how to” is something I can help you with. It’s what I do best: I’ve committed my career to helping people change their rules and change their habits. I’ve seen firsthand what works and what doesn’t, both in the research and in the field, so I can help you skip the common pitfalls, bust the prevailing myths, and fast-track to success.

I’m not going to soft-pedal it, though. Depending on where you’re at right now, this could mean making big changes. But by making those changes to how you eat, you’ll also reap the rewards.

You’ll improve your mood and sense of well-being, the quality of your sleep, they way you perform in day-to-day activities or during athletic events, and of course the way you look.

To do so requires a systematic approach. Here I’m going to teach you a critical part of that system, the Triple S Criterion(created by John Berardi of Precision Nutrition) and the 10 Rules of Good Nutrition, make no mistake, though: even just by applying the principles outlined here, you’ll be ahead of nearly 99% of all recreational exercisers and elite athletes – never mind the general population.

The Triple S Criterion

What’s the Triple S Criterion? Well, it represents a three-step way of evaluating a strategy for its usefulness.

Step 1: Simplicity.

Are the rules easy to follow?

Step 2: Science.

Are the rules based on sound scientific principles?

Step 3: Success.

Have the rules actually worked for people like you?

No matter what nutritional information you’re given, you’ve got to apply that three part test. If the answer to each question isn’t a resounding “YES,” you might as well toss the info out the window.

Think again about those nutritional rules you came up earlier, the things that have influenced your thinking. Would they pass the test? Are those rules based on simplicity, science, and success? And importantly, have they produced the desired effect, a lean healthy body that you’re able to maintain easily? Have those rules built a body that you’re happy with when looking in the mirror?

 If not, perhaps they could use a re-evaluation.

The 10 rules(Habits) of good nutrition

Below, I’d like to present my 10 Rules of Good Nutrition, rules based on the Triple S Criterion above. In doing so, I hope to accomplish 2 goals.

First, I want to help you rethink your whole nutrition approach and provide you with a new set of nutrition rules and habits, a set that swiftly moves you in the direction of your goals.

Secondly, I want to show specifically how these strategies offer much more than a few ideas – they represent a complete success system, fully integrated into the basic habits of good nutrition.

So here are the 10 rules of good nutrition that are not only proven but pass the Triple S Criterion.

1. Eat every 2-3 hours.

Are you doing this – no matter what? Now, you don’t need to eat a full meal every 2-3 hours but you do need to eat 5-8 meals and snacks that conform to the other rules below.

2. Eat complete, lean protein each time you eat.

Are you eating something that was an animal or comes from an animal – every time you feed yourself? If not, make the change. Note: If you’re a vegetarian, this rule still applies – you need complete protein and need to find non-animal sources.

3. Eat vegetables every time you eat.

That’s right, in addition to a complete, lean protein source, you need to eat some vegetables every time you eat (every 2-3 hours, right?). You can toss in a piece of fruit here and there as well. But don’t skip the veggies.

4. Eat carbs only when you deserve to.

Well, not ALL carbs – eat fruits and veggies whenever you want. And if want to eat a carbohydrate that’s not a fruit or a vegetable (this includes things like simple sugars, rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, etc), you can – but you’ll need to save it until after you’ve exercised and for your first meal in the morning(Breakfast). Yes, these often heavily processed grains are dietary staples in North America, but heart disease, diabetes and cancer are medical staples – and there’s a relationship between the two! To stop heading down the heart disease highway, reward yourself for a good workout with a good carbohydrate meal right after (your body best tolerates these carbohydrates after exercise). And in the morning as this will be the meal that breaks your fast and is your energy to start your day. For the rest of the day, eat your lean protein and a delicious selection of fruits and veggies and goo fats.

5. Learn to love healthy fats.

There are 3 types of fat – saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated. Forget about that old “eating fat makes you fat” maxim. Eating all three kinds of fat in a healthy balance (about equal parts of each) can dramatically improve your health, and even help you lose fat. Your saturated fat should come from your animal products and you can even toss in some butter or coconut oil for cooking. Your monounsaturated fat should come from mixed nuts, olives, and olive oil. And your polyunsaturated fat should from flaxseed oil, fish oil, and mixed nuts.

6. Ditch the calorie containing drinks (including fruit juice).

In fact, all of your drinks should come from non-calorie containing beverages. Fruit juice, alcoholic drinks, and sodas – these are all to be removed from your daily fare. Your best choices are water and green tea.

7. Focus on whole foods.

Most of your dietary intake should come from whole foods. There are a few times where supplement drinks and shakes are useful. But most of the time, you’ll do best with whole, largely unprocessed foods.

8. Have 10% foods.

I know you cringed at a few of the rules above. But here’s the thing: 100% nutritional discipline is never required for optimal progress. The difference, in results, between 90% adherence to your nutrition program and 100% adherence is negligible. So you can allow yourself “10% foods” – foods that break rules, but which you’ll allow yourself to eat (or drink, if it’s a beverage) 10% of the time. Just make sure you do the math and determine what 10% of the time really means. For example, if you’re eating 6 meals per day for 7 days of the week – that’s 42 meals. 10% of 42 is about 4. Therefore, you’re allowed to “break the rules” on about 4 meals each week.

9. Develop food preparation strategies.

The hardest part about eating well is making sure you can follow the 8 rules above consistently. And this is where preparation comes in. You might know what to eat, but if isn’t available, you’ll blow it when it’s time for a meal.

10. Change your environment.

Changing how you think and feel is hard. Changing your environment isn’t. And by shaping your environment, your body will follow. But why should everything be so hard, all the time? There’s no need to white-knuckle the willpower. You can actually make change much easier by simply changing your environment. Harness your brain’s autopilot for the side of good: By just changing what’s around you in small ways, you can make changes without even thinking about them.

Some examples:

1.Use smaller plates and cups. Most people eat everything on their plate. Use a smaller plate and you end up eating less naturally.

2.If there’s a food you don’t want to eat, avoid keeping it around. Why risk the temptation? Make it less convenient to eat.

3.Have fresh, healthy whole foods prepared and in plain sight. Veggies and fruits on your kitchen table or counter; that’s a good start.

4.Park your car farther away from where you’re going so you have to walk.Those extra steps add up.

5.Keep your bike ready to go by the front door. Instead of driving, consider biking.

6.Get a dog that needs walking. Even better, one that will chew up your couch as punishment if you don’t take it for a daily spin around the block.

7.Sign up for a CSA box. This way fresh, healthy produce and/or organic meat is delivered to you.

These are just a few effective strategies for awesomeness:)

Habits and your environment are the keys to your success, as your motivation will wane from time to time, so having these habits in place will ensure that you stay on track during those waning moments of your life.

Want to feel more awesome, more powerful, stronger, more confident or maybe you just want to feel better. Come in and give us a 14 day test drive  for only $89. It’s simple, just Email us a info@fit2thecore.com or give us a call at 925-672-5777 to schedule your complimentary strategy session today.

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